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For those of you who dont know, the food pyramid is a carefully drawn up plan of exactly what the human body needs nutritionally. That is, the food pyramid is a guide to help us determine what we should eat everyday. It doesnt have a set menu of food that you need to eat per day. All it has is a guide that can help you plan your meals so that you get the correct amount of nutrients into your system every day. The food pyramid will show you the path to keeping yourself f...

How To Use Food Pyramid Guide For Better Health?

How To Use Food Pyramid Guide For Better Health?For those of you who dont know, the food pyramid is a carefully drawn up plan of exactly what the human body needs nutritionally. That is, the food pyramid is a guide to help us determine what we should eat everyday. It doesnt have a set menu of food that you need to eat per day. All it has is a guide that can help you plan your meals so that you get the correct amount of nutrients into your system every day. The food pyramid will show you the path to keeping yourself fit and healthy through a steady and healthy diet. Up until recently thats all the food pyramid did. In 2005 however, the food pyramid as we know it was changed forever, and a more up-to-date food pyramid took its place. Now youll find that instead of the two-dimensional food pyramid were so used to, its become more three-dimensional. To show the added benefits that regular exercise will have on you, a figure running up a flight of stairs on the side of the food pyramid has been added. Earlier if you looked at the food pyramid you would have seen horizontal lines spanning the food pyramid with the food that we eat the most of, starting at the bottom. The food that we should eat the least amount of, could be found at the top. This is the food pyramid that we all know about and the one that was shown to us when we were in school. The new food pyramid however, is completely different. Apart from the fact that its become three dimensional and has a figure climbing up the side of it, this new food guide has also eliminated the horizontal lines. Instead we can now see lines starting from the tip of the pyramid and radiating downward. Each of these sections are only as big, or small, as the earlier food pyramid sections were. Only with this new food pyramid, you now know that although you need to eat some food types more than others, even within those food groups there are some foods that you should only eat in moderation. Additionally youll also find that your new food pyramid is color coded. So youll get an Orange stripe representing grains; a Green stripe for vegetables; a Red stripe for fruits; a Yellow stripe denoting how much fats and oils you should have; a Blue stripe for the milk and dairy products that youre allowed; and a Purple stripe showing you the quantities of meats, fish, beans and suchlike that you should eat in a day. With six colored stripes denoting the quantities of food you should take, and a figure of a healthy person running up a flight of stairs on the side of it, this new food pyramid is definitely better than the old one, and can help you learn more about better eating habits, and a healthy lifestyle.

Chocolate Fondue Is A Party Favorite

Chocolate Fondue Is A Party Favorite

Chocolate fondue that was a rage in the 1970's is on a role again. Back then there was probably not even a single party that didn't have them - actually it was unthinkable to have a party without them. Chocolate is something that appeals to both young and old the world over, and chocolate fondue are a favorite among all.With time everything changes and chocolate fondue is no exception? At today's parties, chocolate fondue is served and presented differently and there are various ways in which it is done. White chocolate is getting more attention, and the white chocolate fondue is becoming more popular at get togethers and parties.The Popularity Of White Chocolate FondueHaving a party and wish to impress all who attend? Need something that is simple to prepare with a sophisticated flare? Then what you need is white chocolate fondue. You will need twenty four ounces of white chocolate, 1 cup of heavy whipping cream and two ounces of cherry liqueur. Melt it all in a double boiler or fondue pot, add fruit such as fresh strawberries or pineapple for dipping. My family loves to dip marshmallows.You can also spice up your chocolate for variety with a fruit or a mint flavor. These are wonderful for dipping shortbread cookies, pretzels, and a number of other finger foods along with your favorite fruit. Try bananas, apples and orange sections too. Use your imagination, anything goes.How To Display "Chocolate Fondue" At A PartyMany people serve the chocolate in fondue pots. But another idea that is really catching on is a fondue fountain - this is always impressive. The chocolate fountain will become the focal point of the event as your guests gather around to dip.The chocolate fondue fountain doesn't have to be limited to special parties, treat your family on a rainy night. Relax, talk, play a board game and enjoy your time together.

True Paella From Spain

True Paella From Spain

Paella is a traditional recipe of Spain, but there are almost as many variations as there are regions in Spain. And one is more delicious than the next. Paella is made with either seafood, chicken or rabbit, and there is even a vegetarian version. The one unchanging, underlying ingredient is rice.It is important to make the right rice for Paella. Short grained rice that is cooked slowly is the traditional basic for Paella. The other ingredients can be a combination of all sorts of things, but the rice must be the same. Whole grain or wild rice may be used, but the key is that it cannot be quick cook or minute rice, since the rice must cook slowly to absorb all of the flavors of the dish. When cooking Paella, you know it is done when the stock is all absorbed, but the rice is neither soggy nor dry.Paella is the perfect dish for a large crowd, even if you have unexpected guests. You can increase the dish by increasing the rice, and almost any ingredients you obtain will work to make a good Paella.That is part of the magic of Paella: it can be made with any interesting variety of ingredients, as long as you have the right kind of rice and good stock. The stock, imbued with saffron (azafran in Spanish), gives the dish its unique flavor and coloring that is the signature of good Paella.Here is a recipe for the traditional seafood Paella: Ingredients: 4 cups of rice, 8 cups of fish stock, 8 large langoustino, 8 mussels, 1/2 lb. shrimp, 8 oz. peas (fresh or frozen), 2 skinned and chopped tomatoes, 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced, and 3 strands of crumbled saffron, and olive oil for sauteing. (If you want to make it easy on yourself to peel the tomatoes, dip them in boiling water for seconds, then run cold water over them. The skin will come off the tomatoes easily.Saute the garlic in olive oil; add tomatoes, peas, shrimp and saffron. Cook until the garlic is just golden but be careful not to burn it. (That can happen quickly, so stir and watch.) Add the rice and the stock and let the dish simmer for 20 minutes or until rice has absorbed liquid and is a moist but not soggy consistency. Quickly poach the seafood ingredients and add to the dish just before serving.

Beginner's Winemaking

Beginner

It's important to do some homework and learn exactly what's entailed before undertaking the hobby of winemaking. It is not something that can be simply plunged into and then learned along the way. Without the vital research required to have the necessary foreknowledge of each and every critical winemaking step and process, failure is a certainty. When it comes to winemaking, failure can taste as awful as success is sweet.Winemaking is a fun hobby that can easily be done in one's spare time and at the end of the process--provided everything goes well--there will be a glorious result. Many people find winemaking to be an addictive past time, because no matter how well they might do they always envision room for improvement, in the next batch. As more is learned about wine making and as more wine making experience is gained the wine will get better and better. As more and more tips and tricks are learned to help improve the final product, and endless process begins of improving the next batch, and then the next batch, and then the next, and so on.The vast majority of wines are made from grapes for a very good reason: the grape has nearly all of the ingredients necessary to making wine already infused into it. Success in winemaking entirely wrapped up in the balance of chemicals, and the grape has many of the necessary chemicals in it already, in balanced ideal for winemaking.The right balance of sugar, tannin, moisture and nutrients, are vital to create a quality wine, and it just so happens that the grape perfectly fits the bill. This natural balance allows the grape to ferment exactly as it needs to for successful winemaking. However, selecting the proper grape is only the beginning of a successful winemaking journey.There are of course many different grapes that can be used in different combinations. As the hobbyist becomes more skilled at winemaking they may want to try adding a bit of some other fruits to the mixture to give the wine some extra depth and flavoring. Reading about the different grapes that can be used in winemaking and how they affect the outcome of the wine making process can be enormously helpful. Knowing what kind of wine the maker prefers will give them a good idea of which direction to set out in.As with any hobby it is important to keep close in mind that winemaking is supposed to be fun. Mistakes are bound to be made, and no one takes up winemaking without making a few along the way. Don't let mistakes destroy the fun of the hobby. Rather, learn from them and seek to correct them.

Should I Buy Fairtrade, Organic Or Local Food?

Again, I find myself torn apart with choices when deciding which is the most ethical, eco friendly and/or healthy option when it comes to shopping for food and non-food products.Should I buy food and products that support workers in Third World by buying Fairtrade labelled products even though these goods normally travel thousands of miles from Africa, South America or South East Asia? What if these foods were produced with the use of pesticides and additives? It makes sense then to look for and to buy Fairtrade, organic food to both help the producers in the Third World and fulfil my lifestyle choice to eat healthy and additive/pesticide free food. Thankfully, many producers are now wising up to this dilemma by increasingly producing organic and Fairtrade labelled products. I am currently using Fairtrade, organic t-bags at home! Now comes another important question, should I buy Fairly Traded organic sugar from Kenya that has travelled thousands of miles, or should I buy apples grown in the UK (ideally from a farmers market) that have only travelled only a few hundred miles which means less carbon dioxide and other nasty emissions from the lorries that you see constantly on the motorways in the UK? Buying UK products not only ensures less food miles but also supports local farmers, communities and economies. Unfortunately, choice is often limited and can be more expensive then food produced in other countries Decisions, decisions, its probably best to abstain from eating and give your choice making brain a rest!But I can safely say that I make attempts to avoid food or products that have travelled from far away destinations such as Australia even if they are organic! Next time you are in the supermarket or wherever you buy your food from check the labels and you will be surprised by how far your food has travelled. Also look at the amount of unnecessary wrapping such as individually wrapped peppers, mushrooms and kiwi fruit in wrapped boxes. When I buy from the local market I tell them to throw it all into one bag, the customer next to me often has 10 individually wrapped portions of fruit and veg. Thats 11 (10 plus one big plastic bag) bags into the landfill site that day. For maximum eco efficiency we need to be using jute or other bags made from recycled materials and putting all the loose food into that.For recycled bags, Fairtrade and Organic companies, products and food see GuideMeGreen.

Ancient Uses Of Tapestries

Generally large size looms have been used to weave tapestries on. Many types of threads have been used to produce laces like gold, silk and silver threads weaving several pictures of subjects together with those of the peasant scenes after Teniers, Biblical history, mythology, etc. Tapestries have been used as wall hangings but unlike needlework, it was woven on a loom. It was also formed in proportions much larger than would usually be used in hand-stitched embroidery; tapestry panels ranging from ten or twelve feet in height and twenty feet long are pretty common. The chief medium was wool, but in special cases silk was also used. In some of the finest works the use of gold and silver can be seen. The primary heart of tapestry weaving from the year 1500 has been Brussels.But the outputs over the years have immensely varied in quality. Biblical and Roman history, peasant, mythology and scenes ensuing Teniers were some of the subjects. Most seventeenth-and eighteenth-century works are let down by the truth that throughout the years a murky brownish image has faded their red dyes. Brussels tapestries mostly hold a mark with a shield with the letter 'B' on either side. At times weavers add their names or initials, in the work. There were two major factories in France. Both the Gobelins and Beauvais were rooted in the second half of the seventeenth century. While the former was a private concern with State support, the latter was a Royal factory and it was only in the late eighteenth century when one could buy any of its productions. Though both did work of the utmost quality, Beauvais was mainly celebrated for a series of panels established on the Fables of La Fontaine, and for various sets of settee covers and chairs.The former was also made at Gobelins, where around 1775 they made beautiful and exemplary sets of furniture covers and matching wall hangings. Example of these types of decorative harmony is to be seen in a room designed by Robert Adam, remains at Osterley Park, near London. A set of furniture (shorn of its wall-hangings but even now intact Gobelins covers) made for Moor Park in Hertfordshire, is housed in the Museum of Art in Philadelphia. A small amount of of these rich ensembles are intact even now, but a collection of tapestries that had been made for a store at Croome Park in Warwickshire has been sold off for a sum of 50,000, and is now seen in the New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Again in France at Aubusson, tapestry panels, chair covers and also tapestry carpets were assembled. Most of the output belongs to the nineteenth century, despite the pattern of work is similar to an earlier era.Philip and Michael Wauters, supplying to global markets, they wove their tapestry in Antwerp. Works popularized by other plants were copied here with accomplishment, these Flemish tapestries were also at times confused with the English productions they copied. Brussels was the center head of tapestry weaving.

Summary

For those of you who dont know, the food pyramid is a carefully drawn up plan of exactly what the human body needs nutritionally. That is, the food pyramid is a guide to help us determine what we should eat everyday. It doesnt have a set menu of food that you need to eat per day. All it has is a guide that can help you plan your meals so that you get the correct amount of nutrients into your system every day. The food pyramid will show you the path to keeping yourself f...